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Myths & Facts About Sexual Assault

MYTH

Perpetrators are abusive in all of their relationships.

FACT:

Perpetrators of violence have "normal" relationships, but they make a decision to single out and harm a particular person. Keep this in mind if a friend who has been abused identifies a perpetrator you "know."

MYTH:

If a woman or man is being abused, their situation can’t be all that bad, if they stay in the relationship.

FACT:

There are many reasons why a victim may stay in an abusive relationship. She or he may be afraid. They may feel ashamed, even though what they are going through is not their fault. While some victims are able to successfully leave their abusers, for others, leaving is extremely dangerous.

MYTH:

Rape is a spontaneous act of passion.

FACT:

Rapes are committed to control, humiliate, or harm another person. Many are planned in advance and most are perpetrated by someone the victim knows. Passion, lust, and arousal may be present, but they are not uncontrollable urges.

MYTH:

Men can’t be raped if they don’t want to be.

FACT:

Any man can be sexually assaulted. It doesn’t matter who he is, how big or strong he is, or what his sexual orientation is. Some men are sexually assaulted by women. Most are raped by men. The majority of men who rape other men consider themselves heterosexual. They rape men to exert control and cause harm and humiliation. Some men who are raped get an erection or ejaculate while being attacked. This reaction is simply a physiological response to physical contact or extreme stress. Although a perpetrator may try to convince a victim otherwise, getting an erection or ejaculating during a sexual assault or rape is not a sign of consent, pleasure, or sexual orientation.

MYTH:

Some girls and guys "ask for it" by the way they dress.

FACT:

No person does anything to "ask for" or deserve rape.

MYTH:

Stalking is a nuisance if you ignore it, the stalker will quit.

FACT:

Students may be stalked by someone they know or by a complete stranger. In either case, stalking is a serious threat to personal safety and typically escalates without intervention. Stalking episodes can last over two years.

Contact

Lin​da Fontanilla, EdD
Vice President for Student Services
Title IX Officer
T: 949-451-5214

Elizabeth Cipres, EdD
Dean, Counseling Services
Title IX Deputy Officer
T: 949-451-5410

Nancy Montgomery, RN, MSN
Director, Health and Wellness Center
Title IX Deputy Officer

John Meyer
Police Operations Lieutenant
Acting Chief of Police
Title IX Deputy Officer
T: 949-451-5501

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