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S​tem Cells and Society - Bio 71 - Fall 2014
 
THIS SCHEDULE IS APPROXIMATE, AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE
 
Dr. Katherine T. Schmeidler  
Phone:   ext. 5493 -- (949) 451-5493           Office:  A 227           Email: kschmeidler@ivc.edu
 
Office Hours:  Wed 5-7 & 10-11 pm; Thurs 12-2 pm 
                          [check calendar for exceptions and changes]   &  by appointment
 
Please note that our discussion board is up & running in BlackBoard if you wish to participate; also you might want to visit the Genetics webpage (http://faculty.ivc.edu/kschmeidler/docspage/schmeid/index.html)

class​ Topic​ Reading assignment: these will be updated as semester progresses​
​Aug 20​ The nature of a cell and its role in organisms​ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_(biology)      especially: 
Sections 1 and 2; follow the link to nucleus at least, and anything else that interests you
Section 4; at least follow the links for the terms you don't know, and look at anything else that interests you - maybe Sect 6.
Assignment 1
27 Reproduction: the birds and the bees, the flowers and the trees; and others​ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fertilization      note the British spelling
scan the article; at least follow the links for the terms you don't know, and anything else that interests you​
Sept​  3 So, what are these stem cells, anyway?  And what are they not?​
​ 7 LAST DAY TO DROP WITHOUT  "W"​   (last day refund: 8/31/13)
10 Development: how do we start out as an egg and wind up as a chick (or a person)?​
17
**​
How can we “make” stem cells?  Harvesting stem cells​ from a range of sources​ ** mid-semester Portfolio due
24 NO CLASS MEETING
   SEE ASSIGNMENT 
  IN LIEU
 OF CLASS

.
Oct​   1 Cellular differentiation - how cells differ​
  8 Potency, loss of potency, regaining potency and cancer
15​ Hello Dolly: nuclear transfer, cloning​
22
**​
Human stem cells - special considerations ​ ** mid-semester Portfolio due    term paper proposals due

29
Stem cells in breeding projects for agriculture​
Nov   5
Stem cells for repairing and sustaining the environment​
Nov​​ ​ 6 LAST DAY TO DROP WITH a"W"​
12 Stem cell therapies​  
19
**
Clinical research: ethical considerations using human subjects

** mid-semester Portfolio due         term paper due


26
27
NO CLASS

THANKSGIVING DAY
Dec   3

Alternative strategies to using stem cells: pros and cons​
 10
Where we are, where are we going?    
​ ​ ​
17​ FINAL  EXAM and portfolio due
 
Stem cells occur in nature, but we humans can harness them for their potential in medicine to replace cells lost to damage or disease, in a wide array of research programs, and as part of efforts to speed up breeding in agriculture and environment maintenance and sustenance.  In order to introduce cutting edge technologies being developed and refined to exploit these remarkable cells, we will explore firmly rooted scientific methodologies and burgeoning biotechologies.  Biotechnology does not exist in a rarified scientific theoretical world, so the political, social, and ethical ramifications of various aspects of this broad field will be discussed throughout the term.
 
Upon completion of this course, students should expect to be able to:
1. Describe a cell, distinguishing structures and functions unique to plants, unique to animals, and those held in common.   **
2. Describe cell division, and the key elements in its control.   **
3. Describe the role of stem cells in nature.
4. Distinguish among different sources of stem cells to predict their potential uses and limitations.
5. Describe several ways to generate or isolate stem cells, and compare their benefits and problems.   **
6. Describe at least one human, one agricultural, one environmental, and one investigatory use for stem cells, and analyze the importance of each.
7. Predict likely uses for stem cells in the near future, defending the plausibility of the prediction using a scientific approach.
8. Evaluate the cogent ethical, religious, legal, political, economic, and scientific considerations in the generation of human embryonic versus adult stem cells.
9. Evaluate the current cogent ethical, religious, legal, political, economic, and scientific considerations in the use of human versus non-human stem cells.

** SLOs
 
This course will have no exams, but will have quizzes.  These quizzes will include problems, short answer and multiple-choice questions, and open-ended essays.  Each quiz will be based primarily on the material covered in the prior class session.  However, the nature of this class, and our ability to discuss the relevant issues is hierarchical and interdependent.  Thus, to some extent, each topic is also cumulative as more is learned and students are able to re-examine earlier subjects.
 
During class, written and oral participation is expected.  Some of this may be group work, some is individual work.  There will be standing homework assignments, due each week, and some specific homework assigned as topics arise.  Class attendance and participation are REQUIRED - points missed because of missed classes can not be made up except under extreme extenuating circumstances.
 
GRADING SYSTEM:
 
quizzes &  homework             20 @ 10 points each                   200
weekly reviews                       15 @  5    “                              75
class work                             15 @  10    “                           150
portfolio (including portfolio checks *)                                      55
final exam                                                                           40
research paper (including pre-paper assignments)                       80                      Total = 600 points
 
Final letter grades are tentatively assigned:
      >90% = A;   80-89% = B;   70-79% = C;   55-69% = D;  <55% = F
 
If you miss class work or a quiz, make-up work will be arranged if possible, but making up group work may not be feasible, and alternative assignments may not be appropriate.  In that case, no credit can be earned.  Make every effort to attend every class meeting.
 
BE SURE TO CHECK BLACKBOARD AND THE WEBSITE REGULARLY FOR UPDATES,
CHANGES, REQUIRED AND SUGGESTED READINGS, AND FOR ASSIGNMENTS
 
OUT OF CLASS ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE POSTED ON LINE
MOST WILL ONLY BE POSTED, NOT DISTRIBUTED IN CLASS
  
NOTE:  all papers including exams will be returned to student if possible.  IVC regulations state that paperwork will be held for 3 months after the end of a semester.  After that period, all uncollected work will be discarded.  Please note that it is your responsibility to retain all of your records.  No reconsideration of  any grade is possible without evidence, and it is the student’s responsibility to demonstrate the basis of any grade change.  IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO RECOVER THESE MATERIALS!!
 
ACADEMIC HONESTY: IVC Regulations and guidelines regarding academic honesty will be followed and enforced.  Cheating or plagiarism may result in an F on the assignment involved, the entire course, or, in even more serious cases, College disciplinary action may be taken.  If you have any questions or confusion about what is considered honest (and what is not) be sure to clarify these definitions right away!  There are no "second chances".
 
NOTE: IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO DROP A COURSE OFFICIALLY IF THE STUDENT WISHES TO AVOID AN "F".  THE INSTRUCTOR MAY DROP STUDENTS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE, BUT THIS IS DISCRETIONARY.  STUDENTS WHO DO NOT DROP, BUT DO NOT COMPLETE THE WORK WILL RECEIVE "F".  
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