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HUMAN GENETICS AND MEDICINE - BIO 72 - SPRING 2014

Tentative Lecture Schedule and Reading List

 
THIS SCHEDULE IS APPROXIMATE, AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE
 
class    date​ ** pre-class & modules​ topics
Jan.  22​
3,14-18
coin tossing
Introduction to course - What is genetics?  Overview of genetic analysis; sexual and asexual reproduction; reproductive strategies
29
data analysis
33-35, 37
Heredity: chromosome structure & karyotype, mitosis, meiosis, fertilization, “classical” Mendelian analysis & current interpretations; prospective & retrospective analysis
Feb.  2

LAST DAY TO DROP WITHOUT  "W"​​
Feb.   5
36, 38-40 Cell structure; mapping genes I; analysis of crosses and pedigrees; extensions to Mendel
quiz 2: take-home   due 2/12/14 at the begining of class
12
36, 3,13,45
​Genetics of human biology and development; introduction to molecular genetics
19​
EXAM I​​
26 ​45,46 Structure, synthesis, and function of genetic informational molecules:  DNA, RNA, and protein; genetic code
Mar.   5​ 49-51,(52),53 ​Gene expression - mechanism, regulation; genetic information flow:  DNA–> RNA–> protein; variations in gene activity - a molecular level view; regulation of gene activity
12 47,48 ​Mutation: what a mutation is, their causes and their effects; genes and human genetic defects
19​ EXAM II​
Apr.    2​
161-163,165
Development of ova, sperm, embryogenesis and human development; human reproductive system; ways to study genetics in humans; epigenetics
9 58-60 ​Manipulating DNA; DNA sequencing; human genome project; cutting and splicing; producing large quantities of product (DNA, RNA, or protein); "genetic engineering"
14
LAST DAY TO DROP WITH A "W"​​​
16
41-43, 166
Measuring alleles and allele frequencies; using genetic approaches to study human populations and origins; the future of human genetics in medicine
23

EXAM III
30​
58, 59
DNA sequencing; modern approaches to gene mapping & characterization;  genomics - the respective roles of experimental and computational genetics; predicting risks: DNA databases; legal and ethical considerations and concerns (discussion continues throughout)
May    7
63,64
Experimentally manipulated DNA; investigating gene function in development, disease, and inherited disorders; interventive and forensic methodologies: preventing, curing, or reducing the impact of disorders; fertility and treating infertility; genetic counseling
14
63,64
Biotechnology and society: genetic modifications in agriculture, environmental contexts, and medicine; computational genetics, proteomics and other “omes”; cloning entire organisms and their parts; sharing organs and other body parts by transplantation
21 FINAL EXAM: in class​
  
** see on-line syllabus and  “assignments” on website & BB for explanations;   assignments are for preparation for class; expect a quiz on selected material as noted in class, on website, and on BB

NOTE
: IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO DROP A COURSE OFFICIALLY IF THE STUDENT WISHES TO AVOID AN "F". THE INSTRUCTOR MAY DROP STUDENTS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE, BUT THIS IS DISCRETIONARY. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT DROP, BUT DO NOT COMPLETE THE WORK WILL RECIEVE "F".
 

Instructor: Dr. Katherine T. Schmeidler                                              Office: LSB 206
 
Phone: ext. 5493 =  (949) 451-5493                                                      email:kschmeidler@ivc.edu 
 
Please note that our discussion board is up & running in BlackBoard if you wish to participate;
also visit the Genetics webpage
 
Office Hours: T-W-Th. 10 - 11 pm  [T-Th might be in lab, LSB 221]  & Wed. 5 - 7 pm  & by appointment
 
This course will have three midterm exams and a final.  These exams will include problems, short answer and multiple-choice questions, and open-ended short essays.  Each exam will be based primarily on the unit(s) covered since the last exam.  However, the nature of this class, and our ability to discuss issues of human genetics is hierarchical and interdependent.  Thus, to some extent, each exam is also cumulative as more is learned and students are able to re-examine earlier topics.  Following each exam will be a graded, structured class discussion (“debate”) on related material.

The (tentative) class schedule includes suggested reading for each week.  This reading assignment is not exclusive, and is intended as a guide ONLY.  Relevant material may be found throughout the text, and other outside reading may also be assigned.  Students are responsible for material included in assigned reading and all topics covered in class.  Failure to complete any assignment (or arranged substitute assignment) will result in a failing grade for the course.
 
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Describe the molecules involved in genetic information storage and utilization: DNA, RNA, and protein.**
2. Compare the structure and function of genetic information molecules. **
3. List several human genes and their functions.
4. Relate gene structure in mutated and wild-type forms to the effects of the mutation, for several
representative human genes.
5. Describe and compare different approaches and methods for mapping human genes. **
6. Describe, and analyze strengths and limitations, of technologies for analyzing human genetic systems,
including the Human Genome Project. **
7. Describe, and analyze strengths and limitations, of technologies for manipulating genetic systems that
relate to human medical conditions. **
8. Propose and assess ethical arguments relating to the use of genetic manipulation in human medical
practice.
9. Propose and assess ethical arguments relating to the use of human genetic analysis, for example its use in
criminal investigation (forensic use), hiring practices, use by insurance companies to estimate risk.
10. Analyze genetic map information, pedigrees, and hereditary relationships.
** SLO
 
Further details of this course, including learning objectives, are posted on the “details page” of the on-line schedule”.
 
GRADING SYSTEM:
 
3 midterm exams @ 100 pts each                                     300
comprehensive final exam @ 100 pts                                100
homework assignments, classwork, and quizzes               300                        Total= 700
 
Final letter grades are tentatively assigned:
 
>90% = A;     80-89% = B;     66-79% = C;     55-65% = D;     <55% = F
 
If you miss a lecture exam, a make-up exam will be arranged, probably during final exam week. Be warned, this exam may be more difficult than the class exam. You may only make up one exam!
 
Students assessed as requiring accommodation must follow College procedures and notify the instructor accordingly.

NOTE: all papers including exams will be returned to student if possible. IVC regulations state that paperwork will be held for 3 months after the end of a semester. After that period, all uncollected work will be discarded. Please note that it is your responsibility to retain all of your records. No reconsideration of any grade is possible without evidence, and it is the student's responsibility to demonstrate the basis of any grade change. IT IS THE STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY TO RECOVER THESE MATERIALS!!
 
ACADEMIC HONESTY: IVC Regulations and guidelines regarding academic honesty will be followed and enforced. Cheating or plagiarism may result in an F on the assignment involved, the entire course, or, in even more serious cases, College disciplinary action may be taken. If you have any questions or confusion about what is considered honest (and what is not) be sure to clarify these definitions right away! There are no "second chances".
 
All IVC and SOCCCD regulations and guidelines will be followed and enforced.  See the IVC Catalog and MySite for details.
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